Pages

Hai Sai! Welcome to my Blog.

Hello, my name is Tom Corrao and I am the blogger behind the Okinawaology Blog. I created this blog to share and discuss all things Okinawan. I’m also the Public Relations Officer and Minkan Taishi to the Chicago Okinawa Kenjinkai. My experience with Okinawa is derived from the time I spent there during the 1980's and 90's (10 years) when serving in the United States Air Force. I've also been married to an Okinawan woman for 30 years now and have been immersed in many things Okinawan through both friends and family. I do not claim to be all knowing about everything Okinawan but I try hard and study the history and culture. I welcome everyone that is interested in Okinawa and hope that I can provide useful information to those uchinanchu that may be curious about their culture and heritage. I also welcome those who are not of Okinawan heritage but have experienced, or are experiencing, the islands culture while stationed there with the United States Military. Comments are welcomed and will be published as long as they are in good taste and on track with the purpose of this blog. My hope with this blog is to bring Uchinanchu people around the world a little closer to their cultural roots by expressing information that has started to fade in light of a more modern world. We should never forget our culture or the people who came before us and through the Blog my intentions are to meld the old with the new and implant knowledge that will help maintain the traditions and culture of an island people.

Monday, March 1, 2010

The Story of an Okinawan Immigrant - By Dr. Diotoko Kaim

Today, I received a comment on the blog from Edwardo who writes:

Hi there, I Found Your blog, and I am not Japanese, or American, But My Grandparents (Mother side) are from Okinawa, and they came to Brazil in 1915 (I'm not sure). What You can say about the Okinawan Imigration to South America? Congratulations for your great research about Okinawa. I am proud to be a little Okinawan, and have an Utinachu middle name and also I am very interested about this culture. Thanks.

Well Edwardo, I do know a thing or two about the emmigration from Okinawa to other countries like Brazil. My good friend Dr Kiam of Chicago wrote the following story for me of his remembrance of growing up in Brazil and the hardships of the Okinawans who went there.

Edwardo Bem, eu sei uma coisa ou duas sobre o Emmigration de Okinawa para outros países como o Brasil. Meu bom amigo Dr. Kiam de Chicago, escreveu a seguinte história para mim de lembrança de crescer no Brasil e as dificuldades dos okinawanos que foi lá.

After slavery was abolished in Brazil, there was a work force shortage to work in the fields, thus immigration from other countries was encouraged, first from Italy, then Spain, and later from Japan. Due to mountainous geography, short territorial extension and overpopulation, the Japanese government started encouraging people to migrate to other countries, first to Hawaii and later on to South America to places like Peru, Brazil, Argentina, and Mexico.

Após a abolição da escravatura no Brasil, houve uma escassez de mão de obra para trabalhar nos campos, assim, a imigração de outros países foi incentivada, em primeiro lugar da Itália, e Espanha e, posteriormente, do Japão. Devido a geografia montanhosa, a extensão territorial de curto e superpopulação, o governo japonês começou a incentivar as pessoas a migrar para outros países, primeiro para o Havaí e, posteriormente, a América do Sul para países como Peru, Brasil, Argentina e México.




The first group of immigrants from Japan to Brazil came in 1908; more than 50% of them were from Okinawa. With the promise of jobs and fertile land, other groups soon followed and in 1917, my father Kamaa Kian was in one of these groups.

O primeiro grupo de imigrantes do Japão para o Brasil veio em 1908, mais de 50% delas eram de Okinawa. Com a promessa de emprego e de terras férteis, logo seguido de outros grupos e, em 1917, meu pai kamaa Kian estava em um destes grupos .

Kamaa Kian was born to a very poor family in the village of Nakagusuku-son, aza Yagi, Okinawa on 11/23/1898; He was the eldest of three brothers and two sisters. He grew up in the middle of a migratory wave, when it was common to hear about people returning from Hawaii with enough money to build a brick house covered with tiles, which was a very rare thing at the time. There was also much propaganda from the Japanese government about Brazil, where it was said that money grew on trees. Thus, Kamaa decided to migrate to Brazil. Kamaa was a poor man however and did not have enough money even for the cheapest ticket in the bowels of the ship. He solved this dilemma by borrowing the money from his father. Once his plan was in motion he got married to Kamadu who was from his village. Then on June 15, 1917, along with many other families from all over Okinawa, they went to Yokohama, where they took the required health exams and boarded the ship Wakassa Maru. Since most of the immigrants intended to return after 3 to 5 years, the farewell from their parents was considered to be but a brief “SO LONG.” In Kamaa’s case, however it turned out to be a permanent “GOOD BYE”, because the next time he returned to Okinawa would be 40 years later in 1958, when both of his parents were already gone.



Kamaa Kian nasceu em uma família muito pobre na vila de Nakagusuku-son, aza Yagi, Okinawa, em 11/23/1898; Ele era o mais velho de três irmãos e duas irmãs. Ele cresceu no meio de uma onda migratória, quando era comum ouvir-se sobre as pessoas que regressam do Havaí com dinheiro suficiente para construir uma casa de tijolos coberta com telhas, que foi uma coisa muito rara na época. Havia também muita propaganda do governo japonês sobre o Brasil, onde foi dito que dinheiro crescia em árvores. Assim, kamaa decidiu migrar para o Brasil. kamaa era um homem pobre, todavia, e não tem dinheiro suficiente até mesmo para o bilhete mais barato nas entranhas do navio. Ele resolveu este dilema por pedir o dinheiro de seu pai. Uma vez que o plano estava em movimento, ele se casou com Kamadu que era de sua aldeia. Então, em 15 de junho de 1917, juntamente com muitas outras famílias de toda a Okinawa, eles foram para Yokohama, onde assumiu a exames de saúde exigidos e embarcou no navio Wakassa Maru. Dado que a maioria dos imigrantes a intenção de regressar depois de 3 a 5 anos, a despedida de seus pais foi considerado, mas um breve "So Long". Em kamaa do caso, no entanto, acabou por ser um permanente "GOOD BYE" , porque da próxima vez ele voltou a Okinawa seria 40 anos mais tarde, em 1958, quando ambos os pais já tinham ido embora.

 
The Wakassa Maru arrived in the port of Santos, a coastal city in southern Brazil on Dec.30, 1917. The passengers went to the Hostel of the Immigrant where they spent New Years Eve. We can only imagine how homesick those Okinawans were at that time. Their first day in Brazil was on “Tushi No Yuru” one of the traditional Okinawan holidays of their homeland. At the Hostel, Kamaa and others were assigned to work at a sugar cane plantation about 300 miles away. It was a sun up to sun down workday with a wage equivalent to only one cent for their labor. Kamadu, who was now pregnant with their first child, also worked on the plantation for even less of a wage. She would also cultivate vegetables for the family to supplement their diet. They ate a diet of boiled green papaya, which was abundant in the pastures and free for the picking.


O Wakassa Maru chegou ao porto de Santos, uma cidade costeira no sul do Brasil em Dec.30, 1917. Os passageiros foram para a Hospedaria do Imigrante onde passaram Véspera de Ano Novo. Nós só podemos imaginar como as saudades okinawanos que estavam no tempo. seu primeiro dia no Brasil foi em "Tushi n Yuru" uma das festas tradicionais de Okinawa de sua pátria. No Hostel, kamaa e outros foram designados para trabalhar em uma plantação de cana-de-açúcar de cerca de 300 quilômetros de distância. Era um sol acima ao por do sol dia de trabalho com um salário equivalente a apenas um centavo por seu trabalho. Kamadu, que agora estava grávida de seu primeiro filho, também trabalhou na plantação de até menos de um salário. Ela também cultivar vegetais para a família a completar o seu dieta. Comeram uma dieta de cozido de mamão verde, que era abundante nas pastagens e livre para a colheita.
The hardships faced by those early immigrants were all the same, be it in Brazil, Hawaii, or USA. Besides the hard work, they had to endure other difficulties such as language barriers, food differences, and foreign lifestyles to aggravate their adaptation into their new countries.

As dificuldades enfrentadas pelos primeiros imigrantes eram todos iguais, seja no Brasil, Havaí, ou E.U.A.. Além do trabalho árduo, que teve de suportar outras dificuldades, como as barreiras linguísticas, as diferenças alimentares e estilos de vida estrangeiros a agravar a sua adaptação em seu novos países.

In one instance, the language barrier could have had disastrous consequences for Kamaa. After a few months, working on the plantation, Kamaa and others went to town to buy clothes and food, at the grocery store. Kamaa asked for “SODA” a word he had learned in order to make “ANDAGUI.” What Kamaa wanted was baking soda but he was given a can of LYE, which is also known as caustic soda. On checking out, the owner of the grocery was curious and asked what Kamaa was going to use the soda for. Kamaa answered by mimicking an eating gesture. Terrified, the storeowner immediately changed the can of lye for a can of sodium bicarbonate. If it were not for the intervention of that storeowner, this historical account probably would not have been written.

Em um exemplo, a barreira da língua poderia ter tido consequências desastrosas para kamaa. Depois de alguns meses, trabalhando na fazenda, kamaa e outros foram para a cidade para comprar roupas e comida, na mercearia. Kamaa pediu "soda" uma palavra ele tinha aprendido, a fim de fazer "ANDAGUI." Que kamaa queria era bicarbonato de sódio, mas foi-lhe dada uma lata de lixívia, que é também conhecido como soda cáustica. No check-out, o dono da mercearia estava curioso e perguntou o que era kamaa vai usar a soda for. kamaa respondeu imitando um gesto de comer. Apavorado, o proprietário da loja imediatamente mudou a lata de soda cáustica para uma lata de bicarbonato de sódio. Se não fosse a intervenção de que o lojista, este relato histórico, provavelmente não teria foi escrito.

Despite the small wage Kamaa was able to earn, Kamaa was able to save money to send back to Okinawa to repay his father for the tickets. His dream of returning rich to Okinawa now seemed far away. After fulfilling the 5 years stipulated in the contract he signed with the plantation, Kamaa decided to remain in Brazil and started leasing areas to grow rice, corn and cotton. Without the benefits of modern technology however, he had to clear bush and trees, plow, and plant using only animal power. He also experienced problems where the soil would become used up after 3 to 4 years forcing Kamaa to move from place to place and repeat the cycle of clearing, plowing, and planting all over again.

Apesar do pequeno salário kamaa foi capaz de ganhar, kamaa foi capaz de economizar dinheiro para devolver a Okinawa para pagar o seu pai para os bilhetes. Seu sonho de retornar ricos para Okinawa agora parecia distante. Depois de cumprir os 5 anos previstos no contrato ele assinou com a plantação, kamaa decidiu permanecer no Brasil e começou a locação de áreas de cultivo de arroz, milho e algodão. Sem os benefícios da tecnologia moderna no entanto, teve de limpar mato e árvores, arado, e planta usando apenas a energia animal. Ele também problemas vividos, onde o solo se tornaria esgotado depois de 3 a 4 anos forçando kamaa para se deslocar de um lugar para outro e repita o ciclo de limpeza, arar e plantar tudo novamente.




Besides taking care of the house and children, Kamadu helped in the fields and continued to cultivate vegetables. Sometimes the production was more than enough for family’s consumption, so the excess was given to friends or sold in neighborhood.The hardships faced by those early immigrants were all the same, be it in Brazil, Hawaii, or USA. Besides the hard work, they had to endure other difficulties such as language barriers, food differences, and foreign lifestyles to aggravate their adaptation into their new countries. The Wakassa Maru arrived in the port of Santos, a coastal city in southern Brazil on Dec.30, 1917. The passengers went to the Hostel of the Immigrant where they spent New Years Eve. We can only imagine how homesick those Okinawans were at that time. Their first day in Brazil was on “Tushi No Yuru” one of the traditional Okinawan holidays of their homeland. At the Hostel, Kamaa and others were assigned to work at a sugar cane plantation about 300 miles away. It was a sun up to sun down workday with a wage equivalent to only one cent for their labor. Kamadu, who was now pregnant with their first child, also worked on the plantation for even less of a wage. She would also cultivate vegetables for the family to supplement their diet. They ate a diet of boiled green papaya, which was abundant in the pastures and free for the picking.The first group of immigrants from Japan to Brazil came in 1908; more than 50% of them were from Okinawa. With the promise of jobs and fertile land, other groups soon followed and in 1917, my father Kamaa Kian was in one of these groups.


Além de cuidar da casa e das crianças, Kamadu ajudou nos campos e continuou a cultivar legumes. Às vezes, a produção era mais do que suficiente para o consumo familiar, de modo que o excesso foi dado a amigos ou vendidos em neighborhood.The dificuldades enfrentadas pelos primeiros imigrantes estilos de vida eram todos iguais, seja no Brasil, Havaí, ou E.U.A.. Além do trabalho árduo, que teve de suportar outras dificuldades, como as barreiras linguísticas, as diferenças alimentares, e estrangeiros a agravar a sua adaptação em seus novos países. O Maru chegou Wakassa no porto de Santos, uma cidade costeira no sul do Brasil em Dec.30, 1917. Os passageiros foram para a Hospedaria do Imigrante, onde passaram o Ano Novo. Nós só podemos imaginar como as saudades de Okinawa foram naquele tempo. Seu primeiro dia no Brasil foi em "Tushi n Yuru" uma das festas tradicionais de Okinawa de sua pátria. No Hostel, kamaa e outros foram designados para trabalhar em uma plantação de cana-de-açúcar de cerca de 300 quilômetros de distância. Era um sol a sol dia de trabalho com um salário equivalente a apenas um centavo por seu trabalho. Kamadu, que agora estava grávida de seu primeiro filho, também trabalhou na plantação de até menos de um salário. Ela também cultivar vegetais para a família a completar a sua dieta. Comeram uma dieta de cozido de mamão verde, que era abundante nas pastagens e livre para o picking.The primeiro grupo de imigrantes do Japão para o Brasil veio em 1908, mais de 50% delas eram de Okinawa. Com a promessa de emprego e de terras férteis , logo seguido de outros grupos e, em 1917, meu pai kamaa Kian estava em um desses grupos.


With the favorable year round weather conditions vegetables grew quickly and could be sold all year long bringing continuous cash flow, so Kamaa decided to downsize the regular farm crops and concentrate more on vegetable production, which he would take to town in cart pulled by horses to sell at the local market.

Com as condições favoráveis anos rodada legumes tempo cresceu rapidamente e poderia ser vendida durante todo o ano trazendo o fluxo de caixa contínuo, assim kamaa decidiu reduzir o tamanho das culturas agrícolas regular e se concentrar mais na produção vegetal, que ele levaria para a cidade em carro puxado por cavalos vender no mercado local.

The soil was now very fertile, and it was common to harvest cabbages bigger than 10 lbs. even without fertilizer. Sometimes they were so large that they were difficult to sell. The neighborhood market was not big enough to absorb the vegetable production the family was now producing so Kamaa decided to move his family once again to a bigger town where he could sell everything they grew. Now in a new place he produced vegetables, fruits, bananas, and flowers. He also began raising pigs again, something he started doing when they were still on the plantation. The pork operation was profitable in many ways because it produced meat and cooking fat. There were not any cholesterol concerns back then because any fat intake would be burned off while working in the fields. Pigs were fattened and sold, but another advantage was the fertilizer they produced. Of course, cleaning the pigpens and hauling that fertilizer was one of hardest jobs we had on the farm.

O solo estava muito fértil, e era comum às couves-colheita superior a 10 libras. Mesmo sem adubo. Às vezes, eles eram tão grandes que eram difíceis de vender. O mercado de bairro não era grande o suficiente para absorver a produção vegetal da família foi agora produzindo assim kamaa decidiu mudar a sua família mais uma vez para uma cidade maior, onde ele poderia vender tudo o que eles cresceram. Agora, em um lugar novo, ele produziu legumes, frutas, bananas e flores. Começou também a criação de suínos, de novo, algo que ele começou a fazer quando eles ainda estavam na fazenda. A operação de porco era rentável, em muitos aspectos porque produzia carne e gordura de cozinha. Não houve qualquer preocupação colesterol de volta então porque qualquer ingestão de gorduras seria queimado enquanto trabalhava nos campos. porcos eram engordados e vendidos, mas outra vantagem foi o adubo que produziram. Claro, a limpeza das pocilgas e transporte de fertilizantes, que foi um dos trabalhos mais difíceis que tivemos na fazenda.


Kamaa was a very rigid disciplinarian, who was always demanded that his children respect their elders and be polite to others. He taught them never to do anything that they would be ashamed of later, since shame is very strong in Okinawan culture (CHIRA NU HAJI). Coming from a humble family, he taught his children about an Okinawan song that says “MII NU YIRAWA KUBI URIRI” which is about the rice plant once the grain starts to grow, and the tip of the plant turns downward. Working hard he acquired some properties in town which were then rented for income, and soon he was able to put his children through college. There are now two physicians, one nurse, one librarian and a teacher in the family. All of our diplomas are a result of a lot of hard work, sweat, and Okinawan fortitude.

Kamaa era um disciplinador muito rígida, que sempre exigiu que seus filhos respeitar os mais velhos e ser educado com os outros. Ele ensinou-os a nunca fazer nada que eles iriam se envergonhar mais tarde, uma vez que a vergonha é muito forte na cultura de Okinawa (CHIRA NU HAJI ). Proveniente de uma família humilde, ele ensinou aos seus filhos sobre uma canção de Okinawa que diz "MII NU YIRAWA Kubi Uriri" que é sobre a planta de arroz uma vez que o grão começa a crescer, ea ponta da planta vira para baixo. Trabalhando duro ele adquiriu algumas propriedades na cidade, que foram, então, foi alugado para a renda, e logo ele foi capaz de colocar seus filhos através da faculdade. Existem hoje dois médicos, uma enfermeira, uma bibliotecária e uma professora na família. Todos os nossos diplomas são um resultado da um monte de trabalho árduo, suor e firmeza de Okinawa.

Kamaa lived to celebrate all the traditional birthdays of the Okinawan calendar 73, 85, 88, and 97 years (KAJIMAIA). He was the first one to reach 100 years of age amongst the Okinawans in the town where he was living. He passed away in November of 2000, just two weeks short of 102 years.

Kamaa viveu para comemorar todos os aniversários do calendário tradicional de Okinawa 73, 85, 88 e 97 anos (KAJIMAIA). Ele foi o primeiro a atingir os 100 anos de idade entre os okinawanos, na cidade onde ele vivia. Faleceu em novembro de 2000, apenas duas semanas curtas de 102 anos.


Edwardo, I hope this gives you some insight into what your grandparents experienced immigrating to Brazil. I would welcome any further input you may have about Okinawa.

Edwardo, espero que este dá-lhe algumas dicas sobre o que seus avós experientes imigrar para o Brasil. Eu gostaria de receber mais nenhuma intervenção que possa ter sobre Okinawa.


Sincerely, Tom Corrao



Notes:
The pictures used are not actual photos of Kamaa or his family but are immigration file photos from wikipedia.

Translation was done using Google Translate into Portuguese - http://translate.google.com/#


2 comments:

  1. Tom, Thanks for sharing this. Very interesting !

    ReplyDelete
  2. My husband's grandparents are from Okinawa but moved to Brazil also with dreams of a better life. Thanks for sharing this really interesting story.

    ReplyDelete